Serving the Lord through suffering…

Matthew 26:39 My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from me; yet not what I want, but what you want.

In some Christian circles, any form of suffering, especially if it follows a good deed, is seen as an “attack”. But, I think we do God a disservice if we are too quick to attribute these things to the evil one. I have often thought of what Sirach says about suffering:

“My child, if you aspire to serve the Lord, prepare yourself for an ordeal. Be sincere of heart, be steadfast, and do not be alarmed when disaster comes. Cling to him and do not leave him, so that you may be honoured at the end of your days. Whatever happens to you, accept it, and in the uncertainties of your humble state, be patient, since gold is tested in the fire, and the chosen in the furnace of humiliation.” [Sirach 2:1-5]

Read this again: “If you aspire to serve the Lord, prepare yourself for an ordeal.” How many of us know the truth of this first-hand! St. Theresa of Avila, once complained to the Lord about a trial she was undergoing, to which Jesus replied, “Teresa, that’s how I treat all my friends.” Teresa responded, “No wonder you have so few of them.”

The point St. Teresa seems to be making is that the sure promise of suffering seems an odd way to build a following. Yet Jesus showed us that suffering is the very currency of love. A mother sits up with a crying infant all night. A father helps his child with homework instead of going golfing. A priest sits in an empty confessional waiting for and praying for that lost sheep to show up. Jesus pays the price for our sin through his suffering and death.

Suffering entered the world with original sin. But God wastes nothing, not even our suffering. Jesus redeems everything he touches. And on Good Friday, he redeemed suffering. He took something that appeared to be evil and used it to work the greatest spiritual good of all time. As we see in the quote from Matthew, God not only allowed the suffering of Jesus, he willed it. In obedience, Jesus embraced human condition of suffering proving that he is with us in our suffering. As Jesus said to St. Faustina, “My daughter, suffering will be a sign to you that I am with you.” [Diary no 669]

Suffering is not a sign that God has abandoned us. On the contrary it can be seen as a sign of God’s favour. It links us in a real way to the cross, and we come to resemble Jesus in his eyes.

Jesus does not leave us orphaned in our suffering. He is with us and he carries us. Hard as it may be we should get in the habit of giving thanks to God in all circumstances, of praising him even in suffering, and of course offering all to God—joys and sorrows alike—for the conversion of sinners. That way, even if the ordeal is from the evil one, we turn the tables on him, and what he means for our downfall accomplishes great good.

One day at Mass I was looking at the crucifix and praying for the coming of the Kingdom of the Divine Will. I felt the Lord tell me that the road to the kingdom is the way of the cross. We need to view the hardships we are asked to endure, through the lens of the cross, from the vantage point of the Kingdom.

Jesus we trust in you. Even if your designs are too mysterious for us, we trust in you. Father, not what I will, but what you will. Amen.


From my other blog https://pelianitoblog.wordpress.com/ :

Judith 3:13 The Lord heard their prayers and had regard for their distress; for the people fasted for many days throughout Judea and in Jerusalem before the sanctuary of the Lord almighty.

“Beloved children, weep and wail! Offer me all things, great and small, so that the calamities may yet be mitigated. I have been exhorting you to prayer and sacrifice for many years now. My words fall on deaf ears far too often. You who hear me and heed my warnings must bear the greater share of the burden. You are Simon of Cyrene and I am asking you to carry my cross. Do not take it up reluctantly, but with great joy give thanks to God for the great honor he bestows on you and the great trust he places in you in allowing you to carry so precious a treasure as the cross of Christ. Simon could not have known, but you know. Therefore, when I ask you to carry a burden, embrace it with holy joy. Offer it to the Father in the Divine Will in the name of everyone to make up for what is lacking in those who refuse their mission. Make your fiat one with mine and our Mother’s. Children, beloved ones, I am depending on you. You have no idea what your fiat can purchase. Trust in me, my children. The world is in need of your fiat!”

O my Jesus, forgive me for all the times I have refused to help you carry your cross. How weak I am! But your mercy far surpasses my weakness and so I ask you in the Divine Will to take all my errors and sins and redo them in the Divine Will as if I had done them well the first time. I ask this so your holy will may be accomplished in the world and that your kingdom may come. I give you my fiat linked to yours and to our Mother’s. Jesus I trust in you.

Advertisements

6 responses

  1. 💒Pax et Bonum! Good thoughts on suffering as we prepare to begin Lent and go into the Passion, Death and Resurrection of our dear Lord Jesus Christ; a beautiful time in the Church when we are cleansed and forgiven in so much love and mercy. Many of the Saints left us a good example of how to suffer in grace and why we suffer. We need only to read more about them, not as a history lesson, but to connect with them as well as Jesus on the Cross. Penitent

    On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 9:07 PM, The Joy of Penance wrote:

    > Janet Klasson posted: “Matthew 26:39 My Father, if it is possible, let > this cup pass from me; yet not what I want, but what you want. In some > Christian circles, any form of suffering, especially if it follows a good > deed, is seen as an “attack”. But, I think we do God a disser” >

    Like

    • That is true penitent. Does it also happen to you that there are more opportunities to suffer during Lent than any other time of the year? One of my sisters has a saying when suffering comes during Lent: “Ah! Lent!” That says it all. 🙂

      Like

      • Pax et Bonum! A friend and I have both noticed that during Lent we have more crosses or suddenly a bigger cross to carry through Lent, so we have an expression we use now – “Lent is upon us!” Embrace the Cross…..Penitent

        Like

  2. Dear Pelianito, this writing gives me great solace in a time of profound suffering for me and my children. My husband has deeply grieved us by doing something unthinkable, unconscionable and we are reeling from the consequences.
    “Jesus does not leave us orphaned in our suffering. He is with us and he carries us. ”
    This alone helps me very much as I face a very uncertain future.
    I ask for your prayers and for those of anyone in this community who would care to pray for us.
    God bless
    marie

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s