The "Gift of all Gifts"…

Dear friends, I have been feeling the call to more fervently promote Our Lord’s teachings on the “Gift of Living in the Divine Will”, which He gave to us through Luisa Piccarreta. God has reserved this extraordinary grace, this “Gift of all gifts” for our time as a remedy—and more than a remedy—for the unprecedented ills of the world. I have listed below resources which will explain clearly the distinction between doing the Divine Will and living in the Divine Will. Believe me it makes all the difference in the world. God is not playing a defensive game, He’s playing offense all the way to His unstoppable victory.

Luisa Piccarreta was a very saintly soul (1865-1947), unimaginably humble, with a singular mystical life, whose holiness has been recognized, not just by her those who knew her (including St. Padre Pio), but at the highest levels of the Church. She has been declared Servant of God and her cause for beatification has been submitted to the Vatican. Her diary, over 8000 pages, has been studied by Vatican theologians in the Italian translation and has been found to contain no errors in faith or morals. The Vatican Press published her biography in 2015.

The censor liborum of Luisa’s writings was Rev. Annibale (or Hannibale) di Francia. A holy man and the Founder of two religious orders, he was the first and most rigorous promoter of Luisa’s writings. He was canonised by Pope John Paul II in 2004, and in 2010 Pope Benedict XVI installed a large statue of the saint outside the Vatican Basilica.

Jesus tells Luisa that the Holy Spirit is ready to descend in His fullness on the earth, to usher in the Era of Sanctification through this Gift. Please, I invite you to watch  to this new 27-minute video by Daniel O’Connor, and this 13-minute video (Divine Will in a Nutshell) by Fr. Joseph Iannuzzi. Fr. Iannuzzi has been tasked by the Vatican to work on the English translation of Luisa’s 36-volume diary which Jesus titled, “The Book of Heaven” (sometimes referred to as, “The Volumes”).  His Doctoral Dissertation on the subject was given Ecclesiastical Approbation by the Pontifical Gregorian University of Rome, authorized by the Holy See. Fr. Robert Young (may he rest in peace) has an excellent series of podcasts on the Divine Will, found at https://divinewilllife.org/, including a 12 part Introduction to the Divine Will. He also has this one hour talk as a shorter introduction.

The Gift of Living in the Divine Will is meant for everyone. It is not meant to replace other Catholic spiritualities, but embraces and enhances them. We continue to do all our good and holy practices, but learn to do them in a new way by grace. The more people there are that desire this gift and learn about it, the sooner the Immaculate Heart will triumph, and the Kingdom of the Divine Will come to reign. I implore you, if you have not already done so, to take this call seriously.

There is much, much more information in the videos, and a little more from me in this post. If you feel a stirring in your heart, know and believe that God is calling you to be part of this Great Work of His. May God guide us all deeper into His holy and adorable Will. Fiat!

The Inner Thoughts of Many…

Then Simeon blessed them and said to his mother Mary, ‘This child is destined for the falling and the rising of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be opposed so that the inner thoughts of many will be revealed…’ (Luke 2:34-35)

I had different idea brewing to write about, but when I heard the above verse from the Gospel reading at Mass on the feast day of the Presentation of Our Lord, it pierced me. There is so much in it that speaks to our time, especially the last phrase.

First of all, it seems that the more society rejects God, the more “free” people feel to give voice to things that in the past might have remained unspoken. The “inside voice” has become the “outside voice”. Everyone is talking at once, and almost no one is prepared to be swayed from their position. Amidst the noise and chaos is a spiritual dynamic: the inner thoughts of many are being revealed.

In the past only God had access to our inner thoughts. Now we are all being exposed to the cacophony. We are getting a taste of what God has had to endure since the fall, but amplified in our day, and there is almost no escape. Oh, the wisdom of silent contemplation! The mind of man is a bucking wild horse broken free of its last harness. Look out!

The second reason this phrase pierced me is that I have recently read a book titled, “The Warning: Testimonies and Prophecies of the Illumination of Conscience” by Christine Watkins*. For those of you who have never heard of the prophesied “warning” or “illumination of conscience” I offer you a simple explanation. The prophecy, explicated by numerous well-known saints and mystics including St. Faustina, tells of an coming manifestation of God’s mercy in which we will see ourselves as God sees us, in the light of Truth, but also in the light of his unimaginable love for poor sinner and has been called “a judgment in miniature”. It will be a great shaking for humanity, an event that will remove all doubt about the existence of our perfectly merciful and perfectly just God, a time of decision for every living human soul each of whom will have to answer the question posed by God: “Are you with Me or against Me?”

The foreword of the above-mentioned book was written by Bishop Gavin Ashenden (Chaplain to the Queen of England from 2008 to 2017). He begins by saying, “Every so often a book falls into one’s hands that is particularly powerful in unveiling the mystery and power of God’s purpose for his Church today, and this is one such.” The book contains, not just prophecies, but real-life testimonies of people who have already experienced an illumination, a sneak-preview of what is purportedly to come.

Intrigued, I bought the e-book, not realizing that one of the people whose testimony is included is, in fact, a friend of mine. I knew her at the time she experienced her illumination several years ago. It left her so shaken it was a full week before she could speak to me about it. The experience was extremely painful—to see how her sins had hurt Our Lord. It left her with a profound sense of gratitude and love of our merciful God, along with a burning desire never to hurt him again, which has not waned to this day.

Reading these stories helps us to realize that even our little sins hurt God. St. Faustina herself had an illumination of conscience, and described it in this way:

“Suddenly I saw the complete condition of my soul as God sees it. I could clearly see all that is displeasing to God. I did not know that even the smallest transgressions will have to be accounted for. What a moment! Who can describe it? To stand before the Thrice-Holy-God!”

Divine Mercy in My Soul (36)

This is not meant to be cause for fear, but is an unimaginable grace leading to a far deeper repentance than we could ever imagine. What a gift! Whether or not you believe that this global event is imminent, it is a ever prudent to keep our spiritual house in order, especially through the grace of mercy and the mercy of grace found in the sacraments.

This past week the Office of Readings in the Liturgy of the Hours, featured a reflection by Saint Bernard, abbot. Though it was penned almost 1000 years ago, it remains a timeless teaching on every sinner’s right to the mercy of God. I was going to use excerpts but could not decide which jewel was superfluous. So, I give the final word to St. Bernard:

“Where can the weak find a place of firm security and peace, except in the wounds of the Savior? Indeed, the more secure is my place there the more he can do to help me. The world rages, the flesh is heavy, and the devil lays his snares, but I do not fall, for my feet are planted on firm rock. I may have sinned gravely. My conscience would be distressed, but it would not be in turmoil, for I would recall the wounds of the Lord: he was wounded for our iniquities. What sin is there so deadly that it cannot be pardoned by the death of Christ? And so if I bear in mind this strong, effective remedy, I can never again be terrified by the malignancy of sin.

“Surely the man who said: My sin is too great to merit pardon, was wrong. He was speaking as though he were not a member of Christ and had no share in his merits, so that he could claim them as his own, as a member of the body can claim what belongs to the head. As for me, what can I appropriate that I lack from the heart of the Lord who abounds in mercy? They pierced his hands and feet and opened his side with a spear. Through the openings of these wounds I may drink honey from the rock and oil from the hardest stone: that is, I may taste and see that the Lord is sweet.

“He was thinking thoughts of peace, and I did not know it, for who knows the mind of the Lord, or who has been his counselor? But the piercing nail has become a key to unlock the door, that I may see the good will of the Lord. And what can I see as I look through the hole? Both the nail and the wound cry out that God was in Christ reconciling the world to himself. The sword pierced his soul and came close to his heart, so that he might be able to feel compassion for me in my weaknesses.

“Through these sacred wounds we can see the secret of his heart, the great mystery of love, the sincerity of his mercy with which he visited us from on high. Where have your love, your mercy, your compassion shone out more luminously that in your wounds, sweet, gentle Lord of mercy? More mercy than this no one has than that he lay down his life for those who are doomed to death.

“My merit comes from his mercy; for I do not lack merit so long as he does not lack pity. And if the Lord’s mercies are many, then I am rich in merits. For even if I am aware of many sins, what does it matter? Where sin abounded grace has overflowed. And if the Lord’s mercies are from all ages for ever, I too will sing of the mercies of the Lord for ever. Will I not sing of my own righteousness? No, Lord, I shall be mindful only of your justice. Yet that too is my own; for God has made you my righteousness.”

Second Reading in the Office of Readings, Wednesday, Third Week in Ordinary Time

(*”The Warning” is available for purchase at Queen of Peace Media or Amazon)

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Sister Death…

The souls of the righteous are in the hand of God, and no torment shall touch them. They seemed, in the view of the foolish, to be dead; and their passing away was thought an affliction and their going forth from us, utter destruction. But they are in peace. For if to others, indeed, they seem punished, yet is their hope full of immortality; Chastised a little, they shall be greatly blessed, because God tried them and found them worthy of himself. As gold in the furnace, he proved them, and as sacrificial offerings he took them to himself. (Wisdom 3:1-6)

As November is ushered in by the feasts of All Saints and All Souls, it seems a fitting time to contemplate our good friend, Sister Death, our faithful, inexorable, beloved conductor into eternal life. Beloved, of course, by those well acquainted with the unimaginable love and mercy of God.

This week I was watching EWTN’s Journey Home program. The episode featured an atheist turned Religious Sister, Sr. Theresa Alethia Noble, FSP. One of the points she shared was that an important part of her discernment process was a long period of time in which she daily contemplated her death. It served to cement her resolve to live each day as if it were her last chance to become a saint.

As poet Leon Bloy put it: “The only real sadness, the only real failure, the only great tragedy in life, is not to become a saint.” Contemplating our own death can help assist us down that narrow path.

The Office of Readings on the feast of All Souls gave an excellent tribute to Sister Death:

“It was by the death of one man that the world was redeemed. Christ did not need to die if he did not want to, but he did not look on death as something to be despised, something to be avoided, and he could have found no better means to save us than by dying. Thus his death is life for all. We are sealed with the sign of his death; when we pray we preach his death; when we offer sacrifice we proclaim his death. His death is victory; his death is a sacred sign; each year his death is celebrated with solemnity by the whole world.

“What more should we say about his death since we use this divine example to prove that it was death alone that won freedom from death, and death itself was its own redeemer? Death is then no cause for mourning, for it is the cause of mankind’s salvation. Death is not something to be avoided, for the Son of God did not think it beneath his dignity, nor did he seek to escape it.

“Death was not part of nature; it became part of nature. God did not decree death from the beginning; he prescribed it as a remedy. Human life was condemned because of sin to unremitting labour and unbearable sorrow and so began to experience the burden of wretchedness. There had to be a limit to its evils; death had to restore what life had forfeited. Without the assistance of grace, immortality is more of a burden than a blessing.

“The soul has to turn away from the aimless paths of this life, from the defilement of an earthly body; it must reach out to those assemblies in heaven (though it is given only to the saints to be admitted to them) to sing the praises of God.”

From St Ambrose’s book on the death of his brother Satyrus

As penitents we live with death every day as we are called to die daily to ourselves and to our passions. This too helps us down the narrow path.

In a few days, on November 12, BSP members begin our pre-Christmas fast, one of the two 40-day fasting periods we observe each year. May God grant us every grace we need to carry in our fasting His own death as we prepare our hearts to celebrate his holy birth. May He make us all saints.

“Praised be You, my Lord through Sister Death, from whom no-one living can escape. Woe to those who die in mortal sin! Blessed are they She finds doing Your Will. No second death can do them harm. Praise and bless my Lord and give Him thanks, and serve Him with great humility.”

Canticle of Brother Sun and Sister Moon, St. Francis of Assisi

Indulgenced Acts for the Faithful Departed

According to the Manual of Indulgences:

  1. plenary indulgence, applicable only to the souls in purgatory, is granted to the faithful who,
    • on any and each day from November 1 to 8, devoutly visit a cemetery and pray, if only mentally, for the departed;
    • on All Souls’ Day (or, according to the judgment of the ordinary, on the Sunday preceding or following it, or on the solemnity of All Saints), devoutly visit a church or an oratory and recite an Our Father and the Creed.
  2. partial indulgence, applicable only to the souls in purgatory, is granted to the faithful who,
    • devoutly visit a cemetery and at least mentally pray for the dead;
    • devoutly recite lauds or vespers from the Office of the Dead or the prayer Requiem aeternam (Eternal rest).

[Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them. May they rest in peace.]

  1. To gain a plenary indulgence, in addition to excluding all attachment to sin, even venial sin, it is necessary to perform the indulgenced work and fulfill the following three conditions: sacramental confession, Eucharistic Communion, and prayer for the intention of the Sovereign Pontiff.
  2. A single sacramental confession suffices for gaining several plenary indulgences; but Holy Communion must be received and prayer for the intention of the Holy Father must be recited for the gaining of each plenary indulgence.
  3. The three conditions may be fulfilled several days before or after the performance of the prescribed work; it is, however, fitting that Communion be received and the prayer for the intention of the Holy Father be said on the same day the work is performed.
  4. If the full disposition is lacking, or if the work and the three prescribed conditions are not fulfilled, saving the provisions given in Norm 24 and in Norm 25 regarding those who are “impeded,” the indulgence will only be partial.
  5. The condition of praying for the intention of the Holy Father is fully satisfied by reciting one Our Father and one Hail Mary; nevertheless, one has the option of reciting any other prayer according to individual piety and devotion, if recited for this intention.

All Souls Day…

Wisdom 3: 1-5

The souls of the just are in the hand of God,
and no torment shall touch them.
They seemed, in the view of the foolish, to be dead;
and their passing away was thought an affliction
and their going forth from us, utter destruction.
But they are in peace.
For if before men, indeed, they be punished,
yet is their hope full of immortality;
chastised a little, they shall be greatly blessed,
because God tried them
and found them worthy of himself.

ALL SOULS DAY is just around the corner. I admit, I feel its approach more keenly this year having lost both my husband and my father in the last few months. It is a great blessing that my trip to Medjugorje happens to include that feast day. I can’t wait to offer prayers there for all the souls Mary wants me to pray for but especially for my husband and my father.

Here is an article from the National Catholic Register about the indulgences available at this time of year.

Here’s How You Can Help the Holy Souls in Purgatory
We have access to several keys to help rescue the holy souls in purgatory and get them to heaven.

 

I will try to put up one more post before leaving on Monday. I take you all with me in my heart and will pray for your intentions while there.

Dreams as calls to prayer…

2 Timothy 2:20-21 “In a large house there are utensils not only of gold and silver but also of wood and clay, some for special use, some for ordinary. All who cleanse themselves of the things I have mentioned will become special utensils, dedicated and useful to the owner of the house, ready for every good work.”

As you may remember from my May 12 post, my beloved husband of 42 years passed away on May 11 this year. There were many graces around the time of his death and since then, some of which I have mentioned on this blog. Two of those graces came in the form of dreams.

In the last few months I have had a several of dreams that I feel came with a message. I learned long ago to view dreams primarily as calls to prayer. Perhaps that is why I keep receiving them. Dreams and their interpretation can be risky. However, if we view dreams as calls to prayer, it is less likely that we will be misled, so I caution you not to see more in the dreams I will share in the next few blog posts. I ask you to see them only as calls to prayer.

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Providence…

Dear friends, as providence would have it, less than a week after my blog post on praying for those who may die suddenly or unprepared, Jim, my own dear husband of 42 years passed away after a chronic illness. The fingerprints of God, his graces and blessings, are all over this event. I am so grateful for those graces, most especially, the following…

+ That I had time to pray a Divine Mercy chaplet in his presence at the hospital unaware that he would not be coming home the next day.

+ That even thought he was not Catholic, in the months leading up to his death, we prayed almost daily together the prayer to St. Joseph and anointed our foreheads with St. Joseph oil from Montreal.

+ That I woke early that morning and, as I often do when I wake early, repeated this prayer several times: “Holy Mary, Mother of God, spread the effect of grace of Thy Flame of Love over Jim and over all of humanity, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.” As it turned out I was praying this prayer in the final hour of his life. Blessed Mother! Oh Mama! What a gift and sign!

+ Not least of the graces was the grace of those of you who prayed for the souls who would die suddenly or unprepared. You helped my husband in the hour of his death. God bless you!

God is with us, little children! Let us place all our trust in him. Jesus, Mary, Joseph, we love you. Save souls!

Perilous times…

Of course one does not have to be a prophet to say that we live in perilous times. As the most recent Now Word from Mark Mallet indicates, the chronology is impossible to deny. I was particularly struck by this line in the final paragraph of Mark’s post from Our Lady of Zaro allegedly to Angela; Ischia, Italy; April 8th, 2017:

“My children, the weapon for facing these moments of darkness and pain and for ensuring that all of this is mitigated, is prayer, and staying before Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament: it is there that you will draw the greatest strength!”

This seems to be in line with the perceived call to withdraw in silence and pray.

I had been wondering how to introduce this prayer that came to me earlier today, given the sensitive subject matter. But I see this as a confirmation to go ahead and post it here. Our Blessed Mother has been calling us unceasingly to pray. This week she put this matter strongly on my heart.

CAUTION: MATURE SUBJECT MATTER

The abominable sin of pedophilia has made the news again this week. I praise God that he has rescued even a few of these holy innocents and brought the slaves of satan to justice. Often the police say after months or years of investigations leading to rescues and arrests, that it was only the “tip of the iceberg”. The following prayer formed as I was praying for this intention.

Jesus, in the Divine Will, in the name of everyone from Adam to the last man I ask the mighty army of St. Michael as well as all holy guardian angels of pedophiles and their victims, and my guardian angel, to rush in and rescue these poor little ones who are being viciously used by the slaves of satan. Mama Mary please shine the Flame of Love on every child so that they may be found, and tenderly bind their wounds in the swaddling bands of your sweet Son, Jesus. May your Flame of Love miraculously guide the work of those whose excruciating job it is to search for and find the perpetrators of these horrible crimes. Please heal the wounds they suffer in the course of their work. Then, Mama Mary, may the Triumph of your Immaculate Heart crush the hideous iceberg of this sin and all sins into miniscule pieces, to be dissolved in the infinite ocean of Divine Mercy. Holy Spirit of love, may your kingdom come and come quickly. Amen.

 

 

 

Mountains laid low…

Friends I have re-posted this message from 2014 a few times now, but let it give us all hope. Jesus is near and he waits to be born into our hearts, on Christmas Eve more than any other night. In the Divine Will, through the Flame of Love I pray that Jesus will be born in all hearts. Blessed Christmas to all!

November 12, 2014

(John the Baptist) went throughout (the) whole region of the Jordan, proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins, as it is written in the book of the words of the prophet Isaiah: ‘The voice of one crying out in the wilderness: “Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight. Every valley shall be filled, and every mountain and hill shall be made low, and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough ways made smooth; and all flesh shall see the salvation of God.” ’ (Luke 3:3-6)

For some reason I have found myself doing a lot of apologizing lately. So much so, that I have felt compelled to reflect on the phenomena. Two possibilities emerge: either I have been acting more rashly than usual lately, or else the Lord is giving me some new illumination on the effects my words and actions are having on others. If it is the latter, then comes the horrifying thought that I have habitually acted in ways that are arbitrarily hurtful to others. Mercy!

“Every mountain and hill shall be made low.” As I read the above gospel reading, I begin to realize that these humiliations may be meant to form part of my “fast of St. Martin”**. The mountains of my pride and the hills of my arrogance are being laid low, one at a time. Gee, I wonder how many there are?

As painful and humiliating as the process is, I must be grateful to God for the grace of it. The more the rough ways of my selfishness are made smooth, the more comfortable a resting-place will my heart be for the Prince of Peace when he comes. I suppose it is Mary’s doing. As I prepare to renew my consecration to her on December 12, I can imagine her making ready the poor and lowly manger of my heart to receive the Infant King. Her loving care for my miserable soul dazzles like the star of Bethlehem. Who can fathom her love for us and for all she does to make us ready to receive her Son?

I am reminded of an Advent experience a few years ago. It was a time of great personal trial for me. Our business was failing and the future seemed far from certain. It was at this very low point of my life, during Advent, that God withdrew from me any smidgen of evidence that he was there. I had no comfort. Prayer was a chore. I felt heavy. It was a feeling that went beyond the circumstances of my life. Spiritually speaking, it was a dark night.

There was one prayer I prayed over and over, but even that I prayed without feeling. It was from Psalm 116, vs 10: “I trusted, even when I said, ‘I am sorely afflicted.’” It was a prayer of the will, not the heart. But it was all I could muster, and I clung to it.

It was a long, dry Advent for me. I could not look forward to Christmas in any way. When I went to confession, even though I had not told the priest about my darkness, he made this comment out of the blue, “I see a baby. Why don’t you invite the Infant Jesus into your heart this Christmas.”

I did not give his words much thought. They were far too simplistic for what I was going through. Then, the BSP newsletter came out. In Bruce’s column, lo! and behold, he also encouraged us to invite the Infant Jesus into our hearts at Christmas.

Okay,okay, I’ll do it, I thought. Something simple can always be tried, I suppose. But, like Naaman*, I didn’t hold out much hope.

I dragged myself to Christmas Eve Mass even though I had no heart for it. After communion I decided to try the “simple thing”. I invited the Infant Jesus into my heart. At that very moment, the darkness lifted. The Light was back! I could not believe or understand it, but there it was! My life circumstances had not changed, but my Jesus was back in my heart! With unprecedented joy my heart sang, “Glory to God in the highest! And peace to his people on earth!” My prayer of trust had been answered most spectacularly in my very own Christmas miracle!

If I were to draw a single lesson for penitents from these Advent experiences it would be to encourage all of us to remain docile to whatever the Lord or his Mother ask of us during Advent. As penitents we have a special role to play in making straight the way of the Lord. Let us not begrudge Our Lord and Our Lady anything they ask, but offer it all up for the forgiveness of sins and for the conversion of sinners.

May our Advent sacrifices make straight the way of the Lord, so that all flesh may see the salvation of God this Christmas. May the Infant Jesus dwell in every heart.

(* Naaman – see 2 Kings 5:1-14)

(**Fast of St. Martin – in the BSP we have a 40 day pre-Christmas fasting period that begins after the Feast of St. Martin of Tours.)

Increasing penance…

“Then Jesus said to the crowds and to his disciples, ‘The scribes and the Pharisees sit on Moses’ seat; therefore, do whatever they teach you and follow it; but do not do as they do, for they do not practise what they teach. They tie up heavy burdens, hard to bear, and lay them on the shoulders of others; but they themselves are unwilling to lift a finger to move them.’” (Matthew 23:1-4)

Do you notice how much more you have to pay for torn blue jeans these days? What used to be seen as a sign of abject poverty is now elevated to a status symbol, a fashion statement. I think this can be seen as a metaphor for the spiritual poverty of our age, a sign of the times. It seems many are no longer ashamed of their spiritual poverty, but wear their spiritual dysfunction as a status symbol, a fashion statement. Their spirit may be in tatters, but they’re too cool to care.

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Do not hold this sin against them…

John 12:24 Very truly, I tell you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains just a single grain; but if it dies, it bears much fruit.

The power of forgiveness. We hear about it, we know about it, and most of us have experienced it. Those of us who take advantage of frequent confession—especially if we are prodigal children returned to the embrace of our Father—know very well the power of forgiveness and what it has meant in our own lives. But have we reciprocated that gratuitous gift to others? This is something we must examine ourselves thoroughly on, for it is one of the criteria we will be judged on and it is the true sign of a humble, contrite, and grateful heart.

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